Tag Archives: #harvest

Sunflower Monday

Wow! It has been a while since we have posted…sorry about that. A lot of things have been happening in the garden over the past two weeks. We started a mini CSA-type operation and send emails to interested folks on campus about what is available for harvest each week. If you want to be added to this list, leave us a comment! We also have made copious amounts of pickles, dried plums, kale chips, zucchini muffins, mint tea and pasta sauce. Here is a lovely photo that we took yesterday of one of our sunflowers.

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Beautiful Beets

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Passage’s mad photography skills have provided us with this beautiful example of some of the beets we grew.  Pictured above are striped Chioggia beets (grown from starts) and Golden Beets (grown from seeds).  They are the first of the season, and we hope to have many more to follow.  These were boiled to perfection and enjoyed while writing this post.

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Delectable Delights

The garden is finally beginning to produce some edible delights.  Over the past few days, we have begun to cook, pickle, and enjoy a few different things.  In addition to eating the pickled radishes we made last week (tasty!), we made a delicious marionberry crisp and fresh salad yesterday.Image

The filling of a Marionberry crisp.

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The final product (this is a mini crisp we made for our boss (what’s up Gabe), because we ate the big one before we remembered to take a picture…).

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Salads made from garden-grown radishes, mustard greens, spinach and baby lettuce. We dressed it with a balsamic vinaigrette that was packed with freshly-harvested oregano, sage, and rosemary.

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Pickled radishes, ready to be eaten! 

 

 

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Artichokes are beautiful

On Friday we had our first official (albeit small) harvest: two artichokes! Neither of us had much experience cooking or eating artichokes, but my parents happened to be in town and my mom knows how to cook everything. We prepared them by clipping the thorns off the outer petals and slicing each artichoke in half, and then steamed them for 30 minutes. When they were ready we dipped the petals and hearts in my sister’s delicious mustard vinaigrette–a blissful combination.

Image    One of the artichokes, ready to be cooked.

Two weeks ago we had another (less legitimate) harvest of swiss chard that had been planted a while ago and had gone to seed. Since it held up fairly well to the old taste-test* we decided to use it in a relatively simple and stress-free recipe: Swiss Chard Antipasto from the Moosewood Cookbook. It turned out pretty tasty and although modern culture dictates that we should have used a camera to extensively document the experience, we forgot to take pictures.

–Kristina

 

*a method that we use repeatedly, and for less than ideal purposes such as differentiating between weeds and vegetables.

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